Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
Welsh missionaries and British imperialism

Welsh missionaries and British imperialism

May, Andrew J.

Editorial:
Manchester University Press (P648)
ISBN:
978-0-7190-8035-7
In 1841, the Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Foreign Missionary Society sent its first missionary to evangelise amongst the tribal peoples of the Khasi Hills of north-east India. As a... Más información
Materias:
Editorial:
Manchester University Press (P648)
Encuadernación:
Cartoné
Idioma de publicación :
Inglés
ISBN:
978-0-7190-8035-7
EAN:
9780719080357
Dimensiones:
2340 x 1560 mm.
Peso:
698 gramos
Nº páginas:
338
Fecha publicación :
01-11-2012
Disponible en 0 librerías

Dónde encontrar "Welsh missionaries and British imperialism"

Disponible en 0 librerías

    Sinopsis

    Sinopsis de: "Welsh missionaries and British imperialism"

    In 1841, the Welsh Calvinistic Methodist Foreign Missionary Society sent its first missionary to evangelise amongst the tribal peoples of the Khasi Hills of north-east India. As a history of the Welsh as agents of imperialism, this book follows Thomas Jones from rural Wales to Cherrapunji, the wettest place on earth and now one of the most Christianised parts of India. As colonised colonisers, the Welsh were to have a profound impact on the language, culture and beliefs of the Khasi people. As well as being a study of the early decades of missionary intervention, this book also foregrounds broader political, scientific, racial and military ideologies that mobilised the Khasi Hills into an interconnected network of imperial control. In exploring the localised actions and relationships of controversial missionary Thomas Jones and his fellow workers, the book also provides alternative and surprising readings of the role of the individual in defining the limits of freedom and the rule of law on an imperial frontier. The themes of this meticulously researched history are universal: crises of authority, the loneliness of geographical isolation, sexual scandal and rivalry, greed and exploitation, personal and institutional dogma, and individual and group morality. This book makes a significant contribution in orienting the scholarship of imperialism to a much-neglected corner of India, and will appeal to students of the British imperial experience more broadly. In its focus on the everyday experiences of individuals at the margins, it is moreover a virtuoso performance of microhistorical method.

    Más sobre

    May, Andrew J.

    Información sobre el autor no disponible


    Más títulos de May, Andrew J.
    Los lectores opinan

    Valoraciones y comentarios

    No hay comentarios, sé el primero en comentar

    Añadir comentario
    También te puede interesar

    Libros relacionados